Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre (MBRSC)

MoU signed between MBRSC and UAEU to develop specialised Emirati talent in space technology
June 6, 2016
Dubai, UAE
Within the framework of strengthening cooperation links with educational entities in the UAE, the Mohammed bin Rashid Space Centre (MBRSC) signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the United Arab Emirates University (UAEU) in order to develop qualified national human resources to work in the space science and technology sector. The MoU was signed by His Excellency Dr. Ali Rashid Al Noaimi, Vice Chancellor of UAEU, and H.E. Hamad Obaid Al Mansoori, Chairman of the Board of Directors at MBRSC, in the presence of His Excellency Yousuf Hamad Al Shaibani, Director General of MBRSC, along with a number of executive officials from both parties.

According to the memorandum, MBRSC will coordinate with UAEU to design and develop educational and training programs in scientific disciplines related to space science and technology and satellites to enable fresh graduates to meet the growing needs of the space sector in the UAE.
The two parties agreed that MBRSC will create job opportunities for outstanding students in scientific, technical and space projects, in addition to providing scholarships for students in the engineering and information technology colleges.
Commenting on the MoU signing, His Excellency Dr. Ali Rashid Al Noaimi, Vice Chancellor of UAEU, highlighted the importance of these strategic partnerships and their role in supporting and developing scientific research and providing training and job opportunities with experts and specialists. He explained that the university works to strengthen cooperation and partnership with concerned institutions in order to support studies of space science and satellite technology, thus promoting the welfare of the nation.
His Excellency pointed out that: “The national university has the capabilities and resources to achieve the common goals of the two parties, thus supporting the development of the space science sector, encouraging creativity and sustainability in scientific research, developing scientific research programs with the help of international research centres, contributing positively and effectively to research matters related to the space technology sector, exchanging experiments and experiences with MBRSC and achieving scientific integration.”
His Excellency Hamad Obaid Al Mansoori, Chairman of the Board of Directors at MBRSC, said: “The approach of excellence and innovation adopted by the UAE is based on investing in people. Signing the MoU between MBRSC and the UAEU highlights the shared commitment between academic institutions and specialised entities to meet the requirements of the next stage in the fields of science and technology.
“The rapid growth in the space sector requires the support of the educational sector, relying on the expertise MBRSC engineers and experts have gained, and involving the academic staff in the ambitious development projects and initiatives.”
Praising the role of the university in academic and scientific advancement, Al Mansoori said:  “UAEU is a prestigious educational institution that serves as an incubator for technology and research centres, particularly in the space field. University officials and ourselves have common ambitions and we work together to create and develop specialised, technical and training programs for students and graduates. We also employ the gained skills and competencies in space projects and advanced technology in order to contribute to the growth of the space sector thus building a sustainable economy based on innovation, creativity and excellence.”
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Also attached is a picture during the signing (from left to right)
His Excellency Dr. Ali Rashid Al Noaimi, Vice Chancellor of UAEU and His Excellency Hamad Obaid Al Mansoori, Chairman of the Board of Directors at MBRSC
About MBRSC:
MBRSC is a Dubai Government entity which aims to promote scientific innovation and technology advancement in Dubai and the UAE. The Centre works on research projects and studies related to space science, in line with the approach of the United Arab Emirates, in its quest to develop the sector and build national academic skills through it.
Among the most prominent tasks entrusted to the Centre are the design, implementation, and supervision of all phases of launching the “Hope Probe” to explore Mars. The Centre is also responsible for all projects related to satellite technology and applications and specialized projects, and advanced technical projects assigned to stakeholders. Also, the Centre provides space imaging and earth station services and support to other satellite services.
In 2009, MBRSC launched “DubaiSat-1” into space, the first remote sensing satellite. In 2013, the second satellite “DubaiSat-2” was launched, while work is underway to launch the third satellite “KhalifaSat”, which is being built purely by Emirati engineering and expertise in the UAE.
About the United Arab Emirates University (UAEU) – The National University
Founded in 1976 by the late Sheikh Zayed Bin Sultan Al Nahyan, UAEU is a comprehensive, research-intensive university enrolling about 14,000 Emirati and international students.  As the UAE’s flagship university, UAEU offers a full range of accredited, high-quality graduate and undergraduate programs through nine Colleges: Business and Economics; Education; Engineering; Food and Agriculture; Humanities and Social Sciences; IT; Law; Medicine and Health Sciences; and Science.  With a distinguished international faculty, state-of-the art new campus, and full range of student support services, UAEU offers a living-learning environment that is unmatched in the UAE. 
As a research-intensive university of international stature, UAEU works with its partners in industry to provide research solutions to challenges faced by the nation, the region, and the world.  The University has established research centers of strategic importance to the country and the region which are advancing knowledge in critical areas ranging from water resources to cancer treatments.  UAEU is currently ranked in the top 500 universities globally.
UAEU’s academic programs have been developed in partnership with employers, so our graduates are in high demand.  UAEU alumni hold key positions in industry, commerce, and government throughout the region.  Our continuing investments in facilities, services, and staff ensure that UAEU will continue to serve as a model of innovation and excellence.



Vocational education will help realise UAE Government’s industry sector goals.

Mark Andrews, Head of Pearson Qualifications International (PQI) in the Middle East, believes that quality vocational education programmes will be instrumental in helping to achieve the vision of the newly launched Industrial Council.
June 2016
Dubai: On the 17th April 2016, the Cabinet of the UAE, chaired by His Highness Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, endorsed the launch of the Industrial Coordination Council.

The establishment of the Council forms part of the UAE Government’s 2021 vision to build a diversified, knowledge based economy. It is hoped that the new Council will drive the growth of the Emirates’ industrial sector, helping to increase the sector’s contribution to national GDP. The Council, to be led by the Minister of Economy, will drive unity and bring greater cooperation between the various legislatures in the UAE in regards to industrial development.
A globally competitive industrial sector is high on the agenda of the UAE Government, and having a unified vision and strategy to develop the sector will go a long way to meeting this goal. Equipping UAE workers with the skills and knowledge needed to drive industrial growth will be influential in building a robust, industry-based economy. This includes those workers already engaged in the workforce, as well as younger students currently enrolled in school or higher education.
There is little doubt that a growing and modernising industrial sector requires contributions from a diverse range of workers. Candidates with strong skills in the science, technological, engineering and mathematics fields will thrive in the future economy envisioned by the UAE’s leaders.
But strong industrial growth also depends heavily on having enough vocationally qualified candidates to fill new and existing roles. Industry-reliant jobs are now more technical and highly skilled then in the past, and often require specific and intensive training.
Mark Andrews, Head of Pearson Qualifications International in the Middle East says:
“With industry burgeoning in the UAE, employers often find it difficult to attract candidates with the level of vocational qualifications necessary to perform in a number of roles. Young people in the UAE, like in many other countries throughout the region and around the world, are entering university at unprecedented rates. And yet despite the high level of education achieved by university graduates, many of them find it difficult to secure meaningful work on completion of their degree.
“Encouraging more of our young people into vocational education will therefore alleviate two of the main challenges created by a rapidly expanding industrial sector. Firstly, it will help to create enough candidates with the skills and knowledge demanded by industrial sector employers, and secondly, it will help to reduce youth unemployment figures created, in part, by an over-supply of university graduates. In other words, it will help to overcome the colloquially termed ‘skills gap”’.
The announcement earlier this year from the UAE’s National Qualifications Authority (NQA) and Dubai’s Knowledge and Human Development Authority (KHDA) that some international qualifications will be recognised throughout the UAE is a step towards meeting employee demand for vocationally trained workers. Many qualifications, which have long been recognised by awarding agencies around the world, will now also be officially recognised by the UAE government, making it easier for employees to identify candidates with high quality vocational qualifications. This means for example, that a student completing a BTEC Higher National Diploma at Emirates Aviation University will now have his or her qualification officially recognised by employers, government agencies and institutions throughout the UAE.
Mark Andrews believes that there are other steps that can be taken to boost the number of high quality vocational candidates entering the workforce. He says:
“Increasing dialogue between industry and education will also help to create a workforce ready to contribute to a dynamic, 21st Century industrial sector. Understanding what organisations are looking for in terms of skills and talent, and mapping education and qualifications against these needs is key. Making work-based training a significant component of vocational qualifications also helps to create candidates that can quickly perform in a work environment. Having apprenticeship-style programmes widely available helps to produce a valuable pipeline of highly capable workforce entrants.
“But building workforce capacity in the industrial sector is not just about ensuring that quality vocational programmes are widely available. Young people – through educators, parents and other advisors – need to be made aware of the potential benefits a quality vocational education can bring. Often vocational education is still seen as a lesser choice to a more academic or university based education. Young people deciding on which education route to take need to be informed about the rewarding and often well renumerated career paths that a vocational education can lead to. Encouraging many of our best and brightest to follow a vocational path, will be fundamental to the UAE’s industrial sector meeting its potential”.


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